January 30th, 2005

(no subject)

Aha, I checked the memories and I don't think this is one we've done yet: fortune cookies.

My mom and I tried to make them ages ago, with a recipe that required making batter and pouring out small circles onto a skillet, letting them cook, and then quickly folding them into the proper shape to cool. However, while they were good, they didn't get crunchy, and she doesn't have the recipe anymore. I searched around a bit, but almost everything I found contains egg whites. I know these are easily replaced, but it seems unnecessary to use any sort of binder, considering the ones that came with my Chinese takeout today only list flour, sugar, water, shortening, and flavorings as ingredients. I'd prefer recipes you've tested yourself and feedback on how they worked. Any interesting variations on flavors (who wouldn't go for chocolate fortune cookies? ^_^) are appreciated as well.

just a thought

Is it really a far out idea for those of us that live near to eachother, to band together, and start sort of a vegan LJ Cafe, sprinkled across the world! I think that would even generate enough press for free advertising. Bloggers unite to excite tastebuds!

Making greens taste good

I find greens (like collard greens, mustard greens, and even spinach) to be very bitter. The only way I've had them and LIKED them is in Ethiopian cooking and once at a restaurant called Soul Vegetarian East in Chicago. I've had some in soup once, too, and it was really good, but the greens were not the primary ingredient.

I would love some recipes for greens where the bitter flavor of the greens goes unnoticed.

Does anyone have anything? I really want more of that in my diet, but just don't have any recipes that sound good enough to try. If you think spinach salad is bitter and too earthy tasting, but have a recipe that makes dark leafy greens taste nice, please let me know!!

Many thanks! :)

-Melanie

(no subject)

So I've been on a bit of a middle eastern kick for the past couple days, and I figured I'd share some new recipes I've learned. I've been collecting recipes for a while to add to a cookbook I've been working on, and these are some of the new ones for the middle eastern food section I've gotten from some Lebanese friends.

So here we have two of my favorites, Fool and KoussaCollapse )

(no subject)

i am about to make my first box of road end's organics macaraoni & chreese and i was wondering if there are any specific methods people like to use considering the directions on the box are extremely vague besides how much soymilk to add. should i throw in some margarine too?
people actually eat this stuff, right?

edit:
the noodles plain smelled like a wet dog and the final product needed lots of salt and garlic powder to taste somewhat decent. i'm disappointed.